Home / Travel Tips / Do You Know How To Secure Your Flight Delay Compensation?

Do You Know How To Secure Your Flight Delay Compensation?

Flight delay due to weather
Flight delays due to bad weather – Source: PIxabay

Are you missing out on your share of the estimated €699,667,500 due in flight delay compensation?

SHOCK ALERT: In 2015, over 3,200 flights were delayed for more than three hours and almost 4,800 flights were cancelled. With increased industrial action on the continent, bad weather and staff shortages, figures from EUclaim reveal that 2016 looks to be shaping up even worse with an estimated, staggering €699,667,500 flight delay compensation potentially due to inconvenienced airline passengers.

Having been on the receiving end of a flight cancelled after a 24 hour delay, I can assure you it sucks! To have saved up for the trip of a lifetime, watched the ticking of the clock for endless months only to see the anticipation of your forthcoming adventure extinguished in a heartbeat is devastating. It is even worse if you are short on holiday time and want to make every second of it count. Spending hours in cramped airports with tension levels rising by the minute is certainly no way to wash away the stresses of everyday life.

White sands in an exotic destination
Source: PIxabay

Imagine how you would have felt as a passenger on the ill-fated Manchester to Islamabad flight in August 2013 which eventually departed over 51 hours late!! As a proud Northerner, I love Manchester airport but after 51 hours of it, I think I would never want to set foot in there again!

Retribution

So if this conjures up distant memories of your own flight delay horror, why not seek retribution against the airline? It obviously isn’t personal that they cancelled your honeymoon flight, delayed you so long you missed your grandma’s funeral or best friend’s wedding but it sure is upsetting. You can’t get back the time, you can’t demand compensatory time off work, but you can at least soften the blow with a claim for flight delay compensation from the airline.

Providing the airline is at fault, you can claim a set monetary amount of compensation which can go towards another trip later in the year, or a little weekend getaway to make up for the disappointment you suffered.

Are you aware of your rights?

Here’s what you need to know.

If your flight is cancelled or delayed for more than three hours due to the airline’s fault, the airline must take care of you providing FREE snacks and refreshments and even hotel accommodation. In addition, for flights within the EU, compensation is payable as follows:

  • € 250 for delayed flights travelling up to 1,500 km
  • € 400 for delayed flights travelling more than 1,500 km

and for destinations outside the EU:

  • € 400 for a delayed flight of over 1,500 km but less than 3,500 km
  • € 600 for a delayed flight of over 3,500 km
Fill your piggy bank with flight delay compensation
Source: PIxabay

How it works

To get things off to a start, simply enter your flight details into the home page of the EUclaim website as shown.

Flight delay compensation start screen
Get your flight delay compensation claim started here

Click the big green button to arrive at the following screen.

EUclaim flight details screen
EUclaim flight details screen

Then keep following the on-screen instructions until you arrive at the screen indicating your potential flight delay compensation. In this example, flight BA 632 from London Heathrow to Athens on the 30th June 2016 is eligible for compensation of up to €400 per passenger. Happy days! That might even help the bad memory to fade a little faster!

ON-screen instructions for EUclaim
On-screen instructions for EUclaim
Your flight delay compensation
Your flight delay compensation result

Remember you can only claim if it is the airline’s fault (strike, technical problems or missed flight connections for example) and not for freak weather so don’t waste your time if a hurricane is the reason for your delay. As frustrating as that can be, we can’t blame the airlines for mother nature’s issues.

Assuming you are eligible to claim, I suspect that as a savvy traveller, you will be wondering what the cost implication is.

How much will it cost me?

The good news is that EUclaim works on a No Win No Fee basis meaning that an unsuccessful claim costs you nothing. If successful however, you receive 73% of the compensation less a €25 administration fee per passenger. Two people booked on that flight to Athens would thus be eligible for around €550 net compensation.

Let’s be fair, with the weakened Euro, this is more than enough for you to book a sneaky weekend away to the continent but you might want to choose your airline carefully, after all some are far worse than others when it comes to the number of delays. Rather than me naming and shaming them, feel free to bury yourself in Civil Aviation Authority data which shows delays by airport and airline.

Weekend in Prague with your flight delay compensation
A weekend to Prague maybe with your compensation? – Source: PIxabay

Why EUclaim?

With over 250,000 successful claims and flight delay compensation of €57.1 million in the bag, EUclaim is the longest running advocate for passenger rights in Europe. They help you claim your entitlement from airlines who frequently reject justified claims and you can read what their customers have to say here.

EUCLaim customer testimonials
EUCLaim customer testimonials

You may be tempted to go it alone and contact the airlines directly which is entirely legitimate but this could involve much more effort on your part and be warned, the airlines may not settle instantly.

So if you have suffered excruciating delays this summer and would like to feel a little less hard done by, check out the site and see whether you are eligible to claim.

Share your experience

In addition those who have been the victim of horrendous delays may feel the need to vent. Feel free to share your experiences in our comments box (no swearing please!) or perhaps you have claimed flight delay compensation and would like to tell us about that. Whatever your story, we would love to hear from you.

Pin this as a reminder to make your claim next time your flight is delayed:

Flight delay compensation Pinterest
Source; Pixabay

Disclaimer: Please note this is a sponsored post promoting the benefit of EUclaim to passengers travelling throughout Europe. 

About Anne

Anne is the founder and editor of TravelTheGlobe4Less. If she isn't travelling, she is thinking of travelling or planning her next trip. She has visited over 80 countries on six continents and sampled everything from backpacking to bank bursting travel. Her mission is to help you enjoy more luxurious travel without the luxury price tag through the use of airline and hotel rewards and other money saving travel tips

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39 comments

  1. Christian Hazelwood

    The other side of the coin is when the airlines refuse to honour their legal obligation of providing hotels and meals forcing the passenger to sleep overnight on an airport floor. If you have a credit card, speak the language and can find a room off your own back then the airlines might refund you.
    The regulators and the EC both say tough luck.
    After six years and a huge battle I got a court to pay me 100 euro when I was forced to sleep on the airport floor.
    This now is precedent law, case number B01UB707.
    In his ruling the Judge stated “I would interpret Article 9 as obliging a carrier to pay such sum as it would have been necessary, appropriate and reasonable for the passenger to have incurred in the event of the carrier failing in its obligation under Article 9 to provide care free of charge.”

    So if you have had to sleep on the floor then ask for 100 euro – if they don’t give ti to then take them to a small claims court and quote this case. They will pay up. Good luck.

    • That sounds totally rubbish and the exact same thing happened to me in Washington years ago. I never got anything though so good on you for having the persistence to pursue it. Thanks for commenting and that great tip for others in a similiar position.

    • Jonathan Barrett

      Hi Christian, I am using the Wikipedia report of your claim in a CEDR Claim I am handling for my brother against BA. Can you tell me which airport you were at, was it LHR? Did BA give any excuse for itself not finding you a hotel? In my brother´s case BA said that there were no hotels available at the airport in question (Munich), but it does not look as if they looked in the wider Munich area.
      Thanks and best wishes

  2. These are really good tips! Definitely need to keep this saved for the future!

  3. Carol Colborn

    Wow, great to know! Thank you so much!!!

  4. Im not sure if natural calamity is included on the list to have a claim to delayed or cancelled flights.

  5. Okay, you definitely have me intrigued. Where could I learn more about this policy if I am in the US? We have so many disrupted flights and if weather, I have no problem with it, but most of the time it is not that reason. Thanks for all the suggestions and legwork you’ve done for us. Great article.

    • Thanks for the kind words Melody. Unfortunately, there is no legal obligation on US airlines (see Airsafe). I know how painful it can be in the US though as they do seem to have a very blase attitude to delays. I once slept on the floor of Dulles airport because of some issue that they would not fund a room for. Not fun!

  6. This is fantastic! My luck with flights is quite terrible so I can definitely use this. Thank you for saving me a lot of money in advance, although I would prefer it if I never had a problem with flights again 🙂

    • I am sad to hear that. I think I must have been quite lucky as I reckon it is 6 years since I last had a bad delay, assuming you don’t count getting home a day late because we missed our flights thanks to the Bali airport closing and not telling us.

  7. awesome travel hack!!! I will go and research if anything similar to this is also applicable for asian flights. Thank you!

  8. Nice post and tips on how to get compensated for delayed flights. Flight delay compensation is so much more generous in Europe than in the US. Plus it’s so much easier.

  9. Honestly, that is the most informative and interesting article I have read. Very useful info and I ma bookmarking this for later. I didn’t know that such a website existed. Thanks for sharing!

  10. I honestly had no idea that flight delay compensation was a thing. I wonder if they do something similar in the US?

  11. Wow! This is great information! Who knew?! I’m definitely saving this for reference.

  12. It is definitely important to note that these are for flights that are the “airline’s fault” (not weather-related). It is nice that you can get some money back for certain types of flight delays, though! I’m not sure that in the US we have a similar policy. But regardless, a great thing to note for those traveling within Europe!

    • i don’t think qualification is based on residence but on the originating flight location but I will check that out as it would be good to know. Thanks for raising.

  13. This is so useful and good to know. As a frequent traveler, I’ve actually never thought about how to make a claim in case of any delays. This is great to know that there are options. Would you know if a similar service exists for the U.S.? Definitively keeping this information handy. Thanks for sharing!

  14. Thanks for outlining everything – I think the biggest reason so much compensation goes unclaimed is because people just don’t know that they’re eligible to. Will start sharing your post to help spread the word!

  15. I actually had no Idea this existed… I am an EU citizen but certainly don’t know all my rights! I have to bookmark this post and return to it when needed. Luckily, all my recent flights were on time, but that hasn’t always been the case.

  16. Great tips Anne! I didn’t know you could get a compensation for the delayed flight, only the snacks and hotel room. Bookmarked your post, as I’m going on a three months Eurotrip with many flights, now I know that a serious delay can have a positive side.
    Cheers,
    Nat

  17. I think there are rules all over the world for delays and cancellation of flights, however to get a refund claim is an ordeal. The Airlines would always like to show that we are in the wrong somehow. I guess going with an established consultant may work.

  18. There’s lots of publicity over here about claiming for EU flights. And, I so often find I get a delay that is just 5 or 10 minutes under the limit. We also have the right to vouchers for meals and, where necessary accommodation.

  19. This is very interesting! So far, I’ve been fortunate enough not to experience any major delays although I fly over 50 times a year. I also have travel insurance that covers a few related issues but this site is definitely worth checking out!

    Cheers.

    • I agree. You can definitely claim off most insurance policies but sometimes it can be much less. Definitely pays to check the small print. Thanks for stopping by

  20. That’s interesting Anne. I didn’t realise you could claim for delayed flights in Europe. I’ll definitely bookmark this for when I’m next in Europe, Will this apply to UK flights after Brexit? Also, do you know if there are similar services in other parts of the world?

    • Christina, great questions to which I do not know the answers I am afraid so let me investigate and get back to you shortly. Thanks for stopping by.

    • Christina, here’s a more detailed response for your. It is very unlikely that anything will change because it is the United Kingdom’s interest to ensure that the aviation market is upheld.

      The longer answer is that it depends on the type of Brexit. Should we just leave, in theory that would mean that EC Regulation 261/2004 would no longer apply. That means that all flights with British Airlines, departing the United Kingdom would not fall under the Regulation and would not be able to claim. Only flights from Europe to the UK and European airlines departing England would fall within the scope.

      I wouldn’t want to bet my house on it but I don’t see the UK government making any rash decisions about leaving the EU before they ensure they have protected our interests!

    • Christina, here’s a more detailed response for you. It is very unlikely that anything will change because it is the United Kingdom’s interest to ensure that the aviation market is upheld.

      The longer answer is that it depends on the type of Brexit. Should we just leave, in theory that would mean that EC Regulation 261/2004 would no longer apply. That means that all flights with British Airlines, departing the United Kingdom would not fall under the Regulation and would not be able to claim. Only flights from Europe to the UK and European airlines departing England would fall within the scope.

      I wouldn’t want to bet my house on it but I don’t see the UK government making any rash decisions about leaving the EU before they ensure they have protected our interests!

    • On further investigation, it doesn’t look like there’s anything like this in place in Australia. It looks like it’s up to the airline to compensate travellers if they wish. I believe there’s a movement to change this.

  21. Just got delayed by 5 hours Venice to Munich on Monday. This post couldn’t have come at a better time! Thanks!

    • Oh that is a bummer. It probably wouldn’t have taken you much longer to drive. Go ahead and claim and see how you get on, good luck

  22. Damn. I just tried, we had a 2 hour and 45 minute delay. Here’s what I got “Unfortunately, our data shows that no compensation-related issues occurred with this flight.

    It’s very unlikely that you will be successful in getting compensation. We recommend not pursuing your claim further.”

    • Oh dear Jon. Think it’s probably because it’s below the 3 hour time limit but I for one will definitely be thinking of this the next time I have a delay. I am hoping it isn’t soon though!

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